Author: entrans

About Entrans

The Iron Age in Europe was a period of tremendous cultural dynamism, during which the cultural values and constructs of urbanised Mediterranean civilisations clashed with alternative webs of identity in ‘barbarian’ temperate Europe. Until recently, archaeologists and ancient historians have tended to view the cultural identities of Iron Age Europeans as essentially monolithic (Romans, Greeks, Celts, etc). (more…)
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The Molnik Belt Plate

The Molnik Belt Plate
The Molnik belt plate was discovered in a cremation grave near the Molnik hillfort southeast of Ljubljana. The grave dates to the late sixth or early fifth century BC. The bronze plate, which originally bore a scene of a hunter equipped with bow and arrow, a large dog and a stag set inside an interweaving flechtband and palmette leaves, has become an icon of Slovenian situla art. At one or more points in its history, the plate was broken and the pieces riveted back together as four overlapping fragments, one upside down, with much of the original imagery hidden from view. Nonetheless, the ri...
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Repoussé Earrings from Grofove njive, Slovenia

Repoussé Earrings from Grofove njive, Slovenia
Three sheet bronze earrings bearing geometric repoussé decoration were unearthed at the University of Bradford, having been visible in X-rays of a soil block containing human remains from the site of Grofove njive, near Drnovo in Slovenia. The soil block had been lifted from Grave 2 of an Early Iron Age tumulus at the site, which was excavated by TICA SYSTEM Research and Development Ltd in 2003. Three more earrings had already been recovered from the grave on-site, demonstrating that the individual was interred with a total of six. Parallels for the earrings are not uncommon and are known fr...
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The Kaptol Horse

The Kaptol Horse
This tiny fragment, measuring just over 13mm x 30mm x 32mm, depicts a horse and rider. It comes from a rich cremation grave dating to the late seventh or early sixth centuries BC, under Tumulus 12 in the Gradci necropolis near the Kaptol hillfort in eastern Croatia. The fragment may have formed part of a fibula that adorned the clothing of the deceased, but is now extremely fragile, having been burnt on the funeral pyre during the cremation of the body. Recent analysis suggests that the horse is made of elephant ivory imported from North Africa, which would have made it a rare and valuable o...
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The Vače situla

The Vače situla
Possibly the most famous example of its kind, and now residing in the National Museum of Slovenia, the Vače situla was described by the archaeologist Jože Kastelic as a work of art in which ‘the artist most perfectly and intimately expresses himself and his time’. At just under 24cm tall, and formed from two bronze plates riveted together, the situla was discovered by a farmer in 1882, having originally been buried in a rich grave below the Zgornja krona hillfort at Vače. The uppermost of the situla’s three friezes depicts a procession of men, horses and carriages. The second shows a seri...
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